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In Virginia, going from three months late to three months early – safely

In Virginia, going from three months late to three months early – safely

If the Huguenot Bridge was located elsewhere, replacing it would be much more straightforward: a new 3,000-foot-long span with steel girders and a concrete deck. But in its present location west of downtown Richmond, Va., replacing the deteriorated, 64-year-old span with a wider structure meant the Skanska project team had to address no shortage of obstacles.

At this Connecticut school, zero lost-time injuries

At this Connecticut school, zero lost-time injuries

Zero lost-time injuries on a project is impressive, and that’s what our team achieved during the 25 months they spent constructing the Charles H. Barrows STEM Academy, a public magnet school focused on science, technology, engineering and math in North Windham, Conn.

L.A. Expo project halfway complete without a lost-time injury

L.A. Expo project halfway complete without a lost-time injury

Our team’s $547 million Los Angeles Exposition Line Phase 2 transit project recently celebrated two milestones: reaching the halfway point in construction and working more than one million hours without a lost-time injury. Way to go!

On this Texas project, working more than 1 million hours safely

On this Texas project, working more than 1 million hours safely

September was a month full of milestones at the Ambulatory Care Center expansion Skanska is building at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio. Our entire project (phases 2 and 3) surpassed 1 million work hours with no lost-time incidents. Additionally, the $80 million Phase 2 project went the entire month of September with zero injuries (including no first-aid cases) and the $88 million Phase 3 topped out.

The U.S. could be Skanska’s biggest market, says our global CEO

The U.S. could be Skanska’s biggest market, says our global CEO

The size of Skanska’s business in the United States could overtake that of our company’s Nordic home markets, as we see a surge in work on industrial plants as a result of the U.S. shale gas boom, Johan Karlstrom said last week.

McNally on last week’s tragedies: “That’s not who we are”

McNally on last week’s tragedies: “That’s not who we are”

In an all-employee conference call after last Monday’s horrible events, three of our top executive leaders – Mike McNally, Bill Flemming and Rich Cavallaro – said everyone is responsible for safety, and they asked if we’re investing as much energy as we possibly can into ensuring that everyone goes home safe each day.

In New York City, safety is for the whole family

In New York City, safety is for the whole family

On September 21, Skanska employees and their families spent a sunny Saturday at Family Safety Day, an annual event in which they participated in fun and interactive activities while learning about safety at our Queens, N.Y. office.

After losing his home to fire, this project manager shares fire safety tips

After losing his home to fire, this project manager shares fire safety tips

Jeff Perkins, a project manager in our Metro New York office, compiled a list of fire safety best practices – no doubt there are some items here from which we all can learn.

Starting a new USA Building project? Gloves will be required

Starting a new USA Building project? Gloves will be required

To reduce hand injuries, USA Building is adopting a national requirement that appropriate gloves be worn on all jobsites. Building offices that have had such a policy in place for several years report that wearing gloves soon becomes second nature, like wearing safety glasses and vests. USA Civil has long had a U.S. glove policy.

On our blog, read about the near miss that made one superintendent realize the importance of safety

On our blog, read about the near miss that made one superintendent realize the importance of safety

Michael Richotte, USA Building senior superintendent in Seattle, shares the story of the near-miss accident that almost killed him while he was working as an ironworker for another company.